To Deactivate on Facebook or Not

Last week, I privately warned my Mum, MIL, and some other close pals that they may not be able to see my updates on Facebook anymore once I get my account deactivated.

I didn’t mean to sound melodramatic but I have my solid reasons. They were probably unhappy; but when they learned of the primary reason why I planned of temporarily quitting Facebook, I was relieved that they clearly understood where I was coming from.

However, my husband strongly disagreed and did his best to convince me to reconsider.

“You can’t cut off your ties from people just like that.”

He knew how I love going on Facebook; he’s been very supportive especially when I share stuff about Jamie. He wants my family back home to keep track of Jamie’s progress by posting regular updates. He didn’t want them to miss out on anything about Jamie.

He further quipped that I can well manage or curtail my Facebook usage by doing the following:

1. Log-out from my Facebook account when I feel the need to be productive;
2. Do things according to my schedule;
3. Do not be tempted to log back in until I am done with my “tasks”;
4. Facebook in moderation; Facebooking during my most idle moments, i.e on the train (Read: I am actually on the train while drafting this post).
5. Do NOT deactivate.

I was surprised how he strongly feels about me shunning off my Facebook presence. He is on Facebook alright but he isn’t a Facebooker like I am, if you know what I mean.

When he threw in these inputs altogether for me to seriously reconsider my options, it made me struggle all the more on whether or not to completely deactivate Facebook. Knowing myself being too hooked on FB, it’s going to be too difficult in practice and execution. Facebook has become too accessible and made things at its easiest so it became an easy addiction; it is habit-forming. And yes! I can do Facebook anytime, anywhere!

Last night, I posted my dilemma on my Facebook wall, where else? Lol!

My Facebook shout
My Facebook shout

One of them may not have taken it seriously thus the laugh icon. But it came as no surprise to me at all when virtual pals echoed similar thoughts as that of my husband.

From one of the most respected blogger I look up to.
From one of the most respected blogger I look up to.
Honestly, it made me rethink my options
Honestly, it made me rethink my options
From my girlfriends 😘
From my girlfriends 😘
One more girlfriend ❤️
One more girlfriend ❤️

I am with most of you, if not all. There are a lot of great and amazing things on Facebook; it has become a phenomenon. As a matter of fact, the 16th President of the Philippine Republic attributed its overwhelming landslide victory to the social media platforms. I find it brilliant that his campaign strategists were able to employ and maximize social media to his advantage.

But this is not all about His Excellency. This is just about me- an ordinary wife and a working Mummy who’d like to juggle things in between. My intent is to basically experiment if I am capable of doing greater things if most of my time is spent away from Facebook. This is going to be a huge challenge.

So Why Am I still on Facebook?

Honestly, I still wrestle with this question as of this writing. Without a shadow of a doubt, Facebook has served me well and good for the last couple years especially when I migrated to Australia almost four years ago. It is extremely useful and has exceptionally done wonders in keeping me connected with family and friends; making me feel like I haven’t been away at all for that amount of time.

I am awkwardly aware that about a quarter in my contacts I have yet to meet in person. I have befriended them from the blogs and the relationship has evolved and blossomed over the years. We get to interact at Facebook on a regular basis regardless how irregular we publish updates on our blogs. I may not get the chance to meet them face-to-face and that is alright but who knows? I am not shutting my doors for any “eyeball” possibilities.

My Personal Take

After a much longer and deeper contemplation, I decided to keep my account for the time being. It is a given that Facebook is a “necessary evil” in the digital world and I am more encouraged to use it to my advantage. It is an engagement tool and I will make it work for me and NOT me working for Facebook. I am going to challenge myself to utilise it wisely and be more fruitful with my time. I won’t allow Facebook to steal and waste it when I need to do bigger and more important things. Thus, less time spent in posting statuses, uploading photos, etc.

Don’t get me wrong. Facebook is NOT the end-all and be-all platform. Please do away from this mentality:

“If something happens and you don’t put it on Facebook, did it ever happen?”

For my friends and family who’s interested to know some updates about me, I am hoping you’d take time to visit the links to my blogs as I will be publishing extensive updates from here at least once a week.

Just like the old blogging days.

I hope to win and get back with a pretty much organised and arranged schedule doing many things better than going with silly unimportant stuff on my Facebook Newsfeed.

What Will Happen to my Facebook Account If I Die?

align boxBlog Owner and Post Author: Lainy

OK. So where have I been all this time?

I have been regularly updating my Facebook account rather than my blogs. It proved to be easier to hit the “publish” button on Facebook because I no longer have the need to resize the pictures as opposed to my blogs. I mostly do my Facebook updates via my phone and it was very accessible and convenient. There’s no more need for me to have my laptop running.

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I have spent so much time and effort interacting with family and friends via Facebook. It is too personal that it’s real as it gets.

Then it suddenly occurred to me and it hit me hard:

What if I suddenly pass away?

It may sound morbid but this is an inevitable occurrence which will come- sooner or later; whether we like it or not. It will come like a thief in the night. We really never know as to when, where, and how.

So what will become of my Facebook account after my passing? Will it also die a natural death when I die?

The answers may not be as simple as it sounds but let’s go through this one by one.

To those who are not aware, we can either preserve or let go of our Facebook profiles.

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1. MEMORIALIZE our Facebook accounts.

Based on Facebook Policies and Standard Operating Procedures,

Memorialized accounts are a place for friends and family to gather and share memories after a person has passed away.

Memorialized accounts have the following key features:

  • The word Remembering will be shown next to the person’s name on their profile
  • Depending on the privacy settings of the account, friends can share memories on the memorialized Timeline
  • Content the person shared (ex: photos, posts) stays on Facebook and is visible to the audience it was shared with
  • Memorialized profiles don’t appear in public spaces such as in suggestions for People You May Know, ads or birthday reminders
  • No one can log into a memorialized account
  • Memorialized accounts that don’t have a legacy contact can’t be changed
  • Groups with an admin whose account was memorialized will be able to select new admins
  • Pages with a sole admin whose account was memorialized will be removed from Facebook if we receive a valid request

To request for Account Memorialization, you can use this form: CLICK HERE.

2. DELETE our Facebook Accounts.

If we choose to no longer share to our audience the publications we’ve done when we were still alive, deletion of the account is the way to go.

To do this:

  • From the top right of Facebook, click and select Settings
  • From the left menu, click Security
  • Click Legacy Contact
  • Click have your account permanently deleted and follow the on-screen instructions

To quote Facebook FAQ:

We will process certain special requests for verified immediate family members, including requests to remove a loved one’s account. This will completely remove the profile (timeline) and all associated content from Facebook, so no one can view it.

For all special requests, we require verification that you are an immediate family member or executor. Requests will not be processed if we are unable to verify your relationship to the deceased.

Examples of documentation that are accepted are the following:

  • The deceased’s birth certificate
  • The deceased’s death certificate
  • Proof of authority under local law that you are the lawful representative of the deceased or his/her estate.

If you are an immediate family member of the departed and wants to request for Account Deletion, you can use this form: CLICK HERE.

If your Facebook account is as personal as mine, it is important to discuss this with a trusted close friend or family members and let them know what you want them to do with your Facebook account once you have departed. They can then request Facebook to do either one of the two mentioned above as you had previously instructed.

This way, our memories will continue to live on especially so to those people that mattered to us the most.

Source:
Facebook Help Center

Face(less)book and The 7 Cardinal Rules

align boxBlog Owner and Post Author: Lainy

These 7 things To Stop Doing Now on Facebook is a copyright Article from Consumers Union of U.S., Inc. Hence, I shall merely echo what are the 7 things and leave the link at the bottom if you wish to read the rest in detail.

The 7 things are:

  • Using a Weak Password
  • Leaving Your Full Birth Date in Your Profile
  • Overlooking Useful Privacy Controls
  • Posting Your Child’s Name in a Caption
  • Mentioning That You’ll Be Away From Home
  • Letting Search Engines Find You
  • Permitting Youngsters to Use Facebook Unsupervised

Well, exposing personal information and the risks that it involves would turn it into a Facelessbook.

Read more about it HERE

Experts Warn Facebook Users About Email Scam

I read this elsewhere and you should be forewarned, especially if you have a Facebook account.

Another email scam is circulating online trying to ensnare unsuspecting Facebook users into divulging all their passwords.

Security software maker McAfee sent out a consumer warning Wednesday night after noticing that the email scam had become one of the most active currently online.

The emails suggest the user’s Facebook password has been reset and includes a link to change it.

But clicking on that link downloads a program that allows hackers to learn your Facebook password and any other passwords you use online.

McAfee says it’s the sixth most-prevalent scam that’s circulated in the last day or so.The emails are typically written with poor grammar and awkward phrasing, such as “Dear user of facebook.”

Source: Cananadian Press

Reuters too made it known that “hackers have flooded the Internet with virus-tainted spam that targets Facebook’s estimated 400 million users in an effort to steal banking passwords and gather other sensitive information” at their article, New password-stealing virus targets Facebook

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